Emma Sarro: Publications and Presentations

Dr. Emma Sarro

 

 

Recent publications include:

  • Sarro EC, Sullivan RM, Wilson D (2014) Maternal regulation of infant brain state Curr Biol 24:1664-1669
  • Sarro EC & Sullivan RM (2014) Role of the rodent amygdala in early life and developmental consequences. In: Living without an Amygdala. Eds: Amaral, DG, Bauman M, Adolphs R (In Press).
  • Sarro EC, Sullivan RM, Barr G (2014) Unpredictable stress in neonates leads to enhanced anxiety and changes gene expression related to serotonin and GABA function in the amygdala. Neuroscience. 258:147-161
  • Sarro EC, Kotak VC, Sanes DH (2014) Auditory task learning is associated with diminished cortical inhibition. (In prep)
  • Sarro EC & Sanes DH (2014) Few juvenile auditory perceptual skills correlate with adult performance. Behav Neurosci 128 (1): 29-41.
  • Sarro EC & Sanes DH (2011) The cost and benefit of juvenile training on adult perceptual skill. J Neurosci 31:5383-5391.
  • Sarro EC, Rosen MJ & Sanes DH (2011) Taking advantage of behavioral changes during development and training to assess sensory coding mechanisms. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1225:142-154.
  • Sarro EC & Sanes DH (2010) Prolonged maturation of auditory perception and learning in gerbils. J Dev Neurobiol 70:636-648.
  • Sarro EC, Kotak VC, Sanes DH, Aoki C (2008) Hearing loss alters the subcellular distribution of presynaptic GAD and postsynaptic GABAA receptors in the auditory cortex. Cereb Cortex 18: 2855-2867.

Recent Presentations:

  • Sarro EC, Sullivan RM, Barr G (2013) Unpredictable stress in neonates leads to enhanced anxiety and changes to anxiety related genes in adulthood (Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA).
  • Sarro EC, Sullivan RM, Wilson DA (2013) Developmental and maternal regulation of infant brain state. (Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA).
  • Sarro EC, Kotak, VC, Sanes DH (2013) Juvenile auditory learning is associated with diminished cortical synaptic inhibition. (Association for Research in Otolaryngology, Baltimore)
  • Sarro EC, & Sanes DH (2011) Juvenile Skills Do Not Necessarily Predict Adult Performance. (Society for Neuroscience, Washington, D.C.)